New publications in health economics and genomics 29th June 2021

One publication from the past week:

  • Clinical utility of whole-genome sequencing in precision oncology | link

I’m happy to share any other publications from this week that I’ve missed – just let me know. I publish these updates weekly, on a Tuesday, but only if I’ve seen relevant publications. If you don’t see an update on a Tuesday, assume it has been a quiet week for publications in health economics and genomics.

New publications in health economics and genomics 22nd June 2021

Two publications from the past week:

  • Clinical and cost outcomes following genomics-informed treatment for advanced cancers | link
  • Out-of-pocket and private pay in clinical genetic testing: A scoping review | link

I’m happy to share any other publications from this week that I’ve missed – just let me know. I publish these updates weekly, on a Tuesday, but only if I’ve seen relevant publications. If you don’t see an update on a Tuesday, assume it has been a quiet week for publications in health economics and genomics.

New publications in health economics and genomics 15th June 2021

Two publications from the past week:

  • Cost or price of sequencing? Implications for economic evaluations in genomic medicine | link
  • Determining Cost-Optimal Next-Generation Sequencing Panels for Rare Disease and Pharmacogenomics Testing | link

I’m happy to share any other publications from this week that I’ve missed – just let me know. I publish these updates weekly, on a Tuesday, but only if I’ve seen relevant publications. If you don’t see an update on a Tuesday, assume it has been a quiet week for publications in health economics and genomics.

New publications in health economics and genomics 8th June 2021

Five publications from the past week:

  • Genomic sequencing for the diagnosis of childhood mitochondrial disorders: a health economic evaluation | link
  • A Systematic Review of Discrete Choice Experiments and Conjoint Analysis on Genetic Testing | link
  • Project Baby Bear: Rapid precision care incorporating rWGS in 5 California children’s hospitals demonstrates improved clinical outcomes and reduced costs of care | link
  • Understanding decisions to participate in genomic medicine in children’s cancer care: A comparison of what influences parents, health care providers, and the general community | link
  • Diagnostic Yield and Cost-Effectiveness of “Dynamic” Exome Analysis in Epilepsy with Neurodevelopmental Disorders: A Tertiary-Center Experience in Northern Italy | link

I’m happy to share any other publications from this week that I’ve missed – just let me know. I publish these updates weekly, on a Tuesday, but only if I’ve seen relevant publications. If you don’t see an update on a Tuesday, assume it has been a quiet week for publications in health economics and genomics.

New publications in health economics and genomics 1st June 2021

One publication from the past week:

  • Diagnosing newborns with suspected mitochondrial disorders: an economic evaluation comparing early exome sequencing to current typical care | link

I’m happy to share any other publications from this week that I’ve missed – just let me know. I publish these updates weekly, on a Tuesday, but only if I’ve seen relevant publications. If you don’t see an update on a Tuesday, assume it has been a quiet week for publications in health economics and genomics.

New publications in health economics and genomics 18th May 2021

One publication from the past week:

  • Developing new frameworks to value genomic information: accounting for complexity | link

I’m happy to share any other publications from this week that I’ve missed – just let me know. I publish these updates weekly, on a Tuesday, but only if I’ve seen relevant publications. If you don’t see an update on a Tuesday, assume it has been a quiet week for publications in health economics and genomics.

New publications in health economics and genomics 4th May 2021

One publication from the past week:

  • Early technology assessment of using whole genome sequencing in personalised oncology | link

I’m happy to share any other publications from this week that I’ve missed – just let me know. I publish these updates weekly, on a Tuesday, but only if I’ve seen relevant publications. If you don’t see an update on a Tuesday, assume it has been a quiet week for publications in health economics and genomics.

Translating sequencing into clinical practice in Africa: a health economics perspective

A couple of weeks ago I presented at the 17th H3Africa Consortium Meeting on translating genome and exome sequencing into clinical practice in Africa.

I’ve now uploaded a video of my presentation, in case this is of interest to anybody.

The full abstract for this session was:

Research into genomics in Africa has progressed significantly over the past 10-15 years. In the coming years, attention will increasingly turn to the translation of genomic tests into routine clinical practice. This will naturally require a high quality Africa-specific scientific and clinical evidence base, considerable investment in infrastructure, and new and evolving partnerships between academia, government, health systems, industry, and patients and their families. A crucial component of the evidence base to support translation is data on the health economics of sequencing in an African context.

In this presentation I will provide a health economics perspective on the next steps in this translational journey. This perspective is informed by my experience undertaking health economics analyses as part of the Genomics England 100,000 Genomes Project, and collaborating on health economics studies in other countries translating genomics into clinical practice, including the USA, Canada, Australia and France.

I will describe the health economic evidence that is likely to be required in an African context to support the more widespread use of sequencing technologies, and I will summarise the challenges that may arise when generating this evidence (such as identifying clinically meaningful outcomes and working with big data). Importantly, I will also highlight the many opportunities for African health economists working in this field, who are well placed to address research questions that researchers in high-income countries are yet to tackle. These include investigations into the impact of genetic diversity on the costs and outcomes of sequencing, the cost-effectiveness of introducing different testing models in different settings, and the value of screening for variants that are rare in European populations but common in African populations. I will end by outlining potential next steps, including the need to embed collection of health economic data in new biobanks and large scale sequencing studies at an early stage.

New publications in health economics and genomics 27th April 2021

Two publications from the past week:

  • Toward the diagnosis of rare childhood genetic diseases: what do parents value most? | link
  • Rapid whole genome sequencing impacts care and resource utilization in infants with congenital heart disease | link

I’m happy to share any other publications from this week that I’ve missed – just let me know. I publish these updates weekly, on a Tuesday, but only if I’ve seen relevant publications. If you don’t see an update on a Tuesday, assume it has been a quiet week for publications in health economics and genomics.

New publications in health economics and genomics 20th April 2021

Two publications from the past week:

  • Guidance for the Harmonisation and Improvement of Economic Evaluations of Personalised Medicine | link
  • Micro-costing diagnostics in oncology: from single-gene testing to whole genome sequencing | link

I’m happy to share any other publications from this week that I’ve missed – just let me know. I publish these updates weekly, on a Tuesday, but only if I’ve seen relevant publications. If you don’t see an update on a Tuesday, assume it has been a quiet week for publications in health economics and genomics.