New iHEA Special Interest Group on the Economics of Genomics and Precision Medicine (Econ-Omics)

I’m pleased to report that the International Health Economics Association (iHEA) have recently approved a new Special Interest Group (SIG) focusing on the Economics of Genomics and Precision Medicine (Econ-Omics). I am one of the three founders and lead conveners of this SIG, alongside Ilias Goranitis and Deirdre Weymann.

The aim of the Econ-Omics SIG is to bring together interested researchers around the world to build health economics capacity, advance methods, and facilitate communication and generation of the health economics evidence required to underpin the appropriate widespread use of genomic information in clinical practice. You can find more information about this SIG on our webpage, and you can stay up to date with our news and activities via our Twitter account here.

We have planned a number of exciting initiatives and activities and we’re looking forward to moving these forward over the coming months. These include:

  • An Econ-Omics blog and a quarterly newsletter
  • An annual symposium
  • Coordination of organised sessions at the iHEA Congress
  • A regular webinar series
  • Investigating opportunities for cross-country and cross-regional mentoring of ECRs
  • Sharing of teaching materials related to genomics and precision medicine

Membership is open to all iHEA members who are interested in the economics of genomics and precision medicine. You can join the SIG by logging into the iHEA website, selecting the “groups” section and clicking “request to join” the Economics of Genomics and Precision Medicine SIG (Econ-Omics). We particularly encourage expressions of interest to support the SIG in a convener role – please get in touch if this is of interest.

New publications in health economics and genomics 13th April 2021

One publication from the past week:

  • Using molecular testing and whole-genome sequencing for tuberculosis diagnosis in a low-burden setting: a cost-effectiveness analysis using transmission-dynamic modelling | link

I’m happy to share any other publications from this week that I’ve missed – just let me know. I publish these updates weekly, on a Tuesday, but only if I’ve seen relevant publications. If you don’t see an update on a Tuesday, assume it has been a quiet week for publications in health economics and genomics.

An additional note for this week only: I’ve now been publishing these updates for a year. I find the process useful as it forces me to make time each week to keep up with the literature. I hope the updates are useful for others too. If the updates could be tweaked in any way to be more helpful going forward, please let me know (different frequency or weekday, more/less info for each publication etc.).

New publications in health economics and genomics 6th April 2021

Two publications from the past week:

  • Preferences and values for rapid genomic testing in critically ill infants and children: a discrete choice experiment | link
  • Establishing the value of genomics in medicine: the IGNITE Pragmatic Trials Network | link

I’m happy to share any other publications from this week that I’ve missed – just let me know. I publish these updates weekly, on a Tuesday, but only if I’ve seen relevant publications. If you don’t see an update on a Tuesday, assume it has been a quiet week for publications in health economics and genomics.

New publications in health economics and genomics 30th March 2021

Three publications from the past week:

  • Utility of Genetic Testing from the Perspective of Parents/Caregivers: A Scoping Review | link
  • Universal newborn genetic screening for pediatric cancer predisposition syndromes: model-based insights | link
  • Whole exome sequencing in molecular diagnostics of cancer decreases over time: evidence from a cost analysis in the French setting | link

I’m happy to share any other publications from this week that I’ve missed – just let me know. I publish these updates weekly, on a Tuesday, but only if I’ve seen relevant publications. If you don’t see an update on a Tuesday, assume it has been a quiet week for publications in health economics and genomics.

New publications in health economics and genomics 23rd March 2021

Four publications from the past week:

  • Economic Impact of Coverage Expansion for Non-invasive Prenatal Testing Through a Performance-Based Risk-Sharing Agreement | link
  • Cost of whole genome sequencing for non-typhoidal Salmonella enterica | link
  • Comparison of Decision Modeling Approaches for Health Technology and Policy Evaluation | link
  • Family-level impact of genetic testing: integrating health economics and ethical, legal, and social implications | link

I’m happy to share any other publications from this week that I’ve missed – just let me know. I publish these updates weekly, on a Tuesday, but only if I’ve seen relevant publications. If you don’t see an update on a Tuesday, assume it has been a quiet week for publications in health economics and genomics.

New publications in health economics and genomics 16th March 2021

Two publications from the past week:

  • Comprehensive Genomic Profiling for Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: Health and Budget Impact | link
  • The ethics of resource allocation in translational genomic medicine | link

I’m happy to share any other publications from this week that I’ve missed – just let me know. I publish these updates weekly, on a Tuesday, but only if I’ve seen relevant publications. If you don’t see an update on a Tuesday, assume it has been a quiet week for publications in health economics and genomics.

New publications in health economics and genomics 9th March 2021

Three publications from the past week:

  • Economic evaluation of whole genome sequencing for pathogen identification and surveillance – results of case studies in Europe and the Americas 2016 to 2019 | link
  • Generating evidence for precision medicine: considerations made by the Ubiquitous Pharmacogenomics Consortium when designing and operationalizing the PREPARE study | link
  • Next-Generation Sequencing in Clinical Practice: Is It a Cost-Saving Alternative to a Single-Gene Testing Approach? | link

I’m happy to share any other publications from this week that I’ve missed – just let me know. I publish these updates weekly, on a Tuesday, but only if I’ve seen relevant publications. If you don’t see an update on a Tuesday, assume it has been a quiet week for publications in health economics and genomics.

New publications in health economics and genomics 23rd February 2021

One publication from the past week:

  • Rates of genetic testing in patients prescribed drugs with pharmacogenomic information in FDA-approved labeling | link

I’m happy to share any other publications from this week that I’ve missed – just let me know. I publish these updates weekly, on a Tuesday, but only if I’ve seen relevant publications. If you don’t see an update on a Tuesday, assume it has been a quiet week for publications in health economics and genomics.

New publications in health economics and genomics 16th February 2021

Two publications from the past week:

  • Availability and funding of clinical genomic sequencing globally | link
  • Cost-Effectiveness of Genomic Test-Directed Olaparib for Metastatic Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer | link

I’m happy to share any other publications from this week that I’ve missed – just let me know. I publish these updates weekly, on a Tuesday, but only if I’ve seen relevant publications. If you don’t see an update on a Tuesday, assume it has been a quiet week for publications in health economics and genomics.

Availability and funding of clinical genomic sequencing globally

Just a quick post to share details of a new paper that was published yesterday in BMJ Global Health.

Phillips KA, Douglas MP, Wordsworth S, et al Availability and funding of clinical genomic sequencing globally BMJ Global Health 2021;6:e004415. Link

This is the latest ouput from the Global Economics and Evaluation of Clinical Genomics Sequencing (GEECS) Working Group, of which I am a founding member.

Our aim in this paper was to examine genome sequencing availability across world regions and countries, using three exemplar countries (UK, Canada, USA) to identify data gaps & funding challenges for implementation. We found that these tests are available or becoming available in every major region of the world, with growing availability in countries with upper-middle-income economies. We conclude by assessing what type of data and initiatives will be needed to better track and understand the use of NGS around the world as such testing continues to expand.